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Heart Disease & Prevention
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The heart is a muscle, about the size of a fist, whose main job is to pump blood to all parts of the body, bringing needed nutrients and oxygen and delivering waste products to other organs for removal.  The heart has four chambers. The upper two are the atria (the right and the left atrium) and the lower two are the right and left ventricles. These chambers contract in a regular sequence, or rhythm (the heartbeat), and these contractions enable the heart to pump blood.  "Heart disease” is any disease or condition that negatively impacts the heart's function. Common forms of heart disease are congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease and arrhythmia. heart disease affects more than 20 million Americans, and family history is not the only risk factor. Heart Disease is one of the most-covered and discussed topics among Second Opinion doctors and patients.

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Coronary Microvascular Disease
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Diabetes Prevention
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Healthy Eating
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Inflammation
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Long QT Syndrome
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Racial Disparities in Cardiac Care
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Heart Replacement
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Cardiac Spouses
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Angina
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Controlling Hypertension
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Reversing Heart Disease
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Sudden Cardiac Arrest
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View Myth or Medicine:

Does salt cause hypertension?
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Can diet cure heart disease?
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View Second Opinion 5:

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5 ways to control hypertension
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5 risk factors for heart disease

Featured Experts:

John Bisognano, M.D.
John Bisognano, M.D.
T. Colin Campbell, PhD
T. Colin Campbell, PhD
Christopher J. Cove, MD
Christopher J. Cove, MD
Nieca Goldberg, M.D.
Samuel J. Mann, MD
Samuel J. Mann, MD
Noel Bairey Merz, MD
Ryan Nelson, MD
Ryan Nelson, MD
Jason Pacos, MD
Jason Pacos, MD
Lisa Sanders, MD
Lisa Sanders, MD
Robert Schmit
Bob Schmit

Julia Schmit

Resuscitated Bob Schmit with CPR

Bob Schmit

Resuscitated through CPR

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

(Source: American Heart Association) Cardiac arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart disease. The time and mode of death are unexpected. It occurs instantly or shortly after symptoms appear. Each year, more than 420,000 emergency medical services-assessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States.

Resources
Resource Description: 
The American Red Cross exists to provide compassionate care to those in need. Our network of generous donors, volunteers and employees share a mission of preventing and relieving suffering, here at home and around the world.
The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) is a leading resource on cardiac pacing and electrophysiology. This specialty organization represents medical, allied health, and science professionals from more than 70 countries who specialize in cardiac rhythm disorders.
This is one of the National Institutes of Health and a very important information resource.
Medline Plus
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Conduct an off-site search for information from MedlinePlus.  These up-to-date search results are based on search terms specific to Second Opinion Key Points.

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Reversing Heart Disease

Coronary artery disease occurs when a substance called plaque builds up in the arteries that supply blood to the heart. You can help prevent heart disease by making healthy choices and managing any medical conditions you may have. 

Videos
Myth or Medicine: 
Can diet cure heart disease?
Second Opinion 5: 
5 risk factors for heart disease
Resources
Resource Description: 
The American Heart Association is a national voluntary health agency to help reduce disability and death from cardiovascular diseases and stroke
The mission of Cleveland Clinic is to provide better care of the sick, investigation into their problems, and further education of those who serve
T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization based in Ithaca, NY, home of Cornell University. Started in 2007 by T. Colin Campbell, PhD, and Megan Murphy, the Center grew out of T. Colin Campbell’s life work in nutritional research and the recognition of The China Study, the 2005 book co-authored with his son Thomas Campbell, MD.
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education for people from all walks of life. Doctors from every medical specialty work together to care for patients, joined by common systems and a philosophy of "the needs of the patient come first."
Medline Plus
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Interactive Medical Search logoConduct an off-site search from MedlinePlus.  These up-to-date search results are based on search terms specific to Second Opinion Key Points.

Dr. Peter Salgo with guest, Dick Dubois and Dr. Jason Pacos

Controlling Hypertension

Some call it hypertension. Others know it as high blood pressure. Whichever term you use, it is the same serious health problem - one that increases your risk for heart disease and stroke and can also contribute to heart failure , kidney disease, vision problems, and other conditions.

Videos
Myth or Medicine: 
Does salt cause hypertension?
Second Opinion 5: 
5 ways to control hypertension
Resources
Resource Description: 
ASH is the largest organization of hypertension researchers and health care providers in the United States committed to preventing and treating hypertension and its consequences.
Our mission is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. That single purpose drives all we do.
The Hypertension Education Foundation Inc. (HEF) was incorporated in 1977 for the purpose of increasing both physician and the general public’s awareness of the problems involved in the treatment of high blood pressure and promoting research and teaching efforts in the field of hypertension
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education for people from all walks of life. Doctors from every medical specialty work together to care for patients, joined by common systems and a philosophy of "the needs of the patient come first."
Medline Plus
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Interactive Medical Search logoConduct an off-site search from MedlinePlus.  These up-to-date search results are based on search terms specific to Second Opinion Key Points.

Dr. Peter Salgo with guest, Connie Bentley
Related Topics: 

J. Chad Teeters, MD, MS, RPVI, FACC

 

Chief of Cardiology at Highland Hospital

Dr. Teeters is the Chief of Cardiology at Highland Hospital and a member or the Cardiology faculty of the University of Rochester Medical Center. He completed his residency in Internal Medicine and fellowships in Cardiovascular Disease and Preventive Cardiology at the University of Rochester. During his training he served as Chief Medical resident from 2005-2006 and Chief Cardiology Fellow from 2008-2009. He attended medical school and did his undergraduate training at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Ryan Nelson, MD

 

Highland Cardiology

 

Ryan C. Nelson, M.D., joined the Highland Hospita lDepartment of Cardiology as an attending physician July 1. Dr. Nelson’s responsibilities include inpatient and outpatient visits and consultations as well as diagnostic and imaging tests. In addition, Dr. Nelson will be attending in the Coronary Care Unit at Strong Memorial Hospital for eight weeks each year.

Heart Disease & Prevention

The heart is a muscle, about the size of a fist, whose main job is to pump blood to all parts of the body, bringing needed nutrients and oxygen and delivering waste products to other organs for removal.  The heart has four chambers. The upper two are the atria (the right and the left atrium) and the lower two are the right and left ventricles.

Samuel J. Mann, MD

Professor of Clinical Medicine,
NY Presbyterian Hospital- Weill Cornell Medical Center
Author, Hypertension and You 

I am a physician and researcher specializing in the management of hypertension. I am the author of many scientific articles, book chapters, and 2 books. My focus is on improving the management of hypertension by getting patients onto the drugs, combinations and dosages that are right for them. Different patients need different medications depending on what is driving their hypertension.  My particular interests are the treatment of resistant hypertension and paroxysmal (episodic) hypertension.

T. Colin Campbell, PhD

Professor Emeritus
Cornell, University
Co-Author, The China Study 

T. Colin Campbell, PhD, has had a long career in biomedical research, mostly at Cornell University where he now holds the position of Jacob Schurman Professor Emeritus of Nutritional Biochemistry.

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